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Walters Residence

Walters Residence

 

The “GREENville House”/Walters Residence is composed of two primary design components: bars and panels. Each acts together to generate an environmentally sensitive response. Narrow bars composed of private space branch out into the landscape to create courtyards, capture natural light, allow cross ventilation, and intersect to form a central volume of double height public space. Open to the kitchen and dining and a balcony and loft above, this central volume aligns with compelling views of the landscape. A structural system holding photovoltaic panels and perforated screens is responsible for creating the home’s energy and hot water while shading openings to alleviate unnecessary heat gain. The building’s orientation on the site utilizes the maximum potential of the photovoltaic technology, decreasing the overall load on the geothermal HVAC system. READ MORE & SEE THE GALLERY…

by , 10/19/12

Tonic Design has been on the green beat from the start with their contemporary, environmentally friendly home designs. This is particularly true of the GREENville residence located in the North Carolina city with the same name. The home’s striking program is defined by bars and panels, and it is powered by both solar and geothermal energy. It also features a slew of passive design techniques that further reduce its carbon footprint. READ MORE

October 18, 2012

Architects: Tonic Design
Location: , North Carolina, United States
Architect In Charge: Vinny Petrarca
Photographs: Todd Lanning

The “GREENville House”/Walters Residence is composed of two primary design components: bars and panels. Each acts together to generate an environmentally sensitive response. Narrow bars composed of private space branch out into the landscape to create courtyards, capture natural light, allow cross ventilation, and intersect to form a central volume of double height public space. READ MORE…

June 2012Image

…In Greenville, North Carolina, the Walters Residence, a sleek, modern residence designed by Tonic Design + Build, is an excellent example of the use of architectural zinc in an eco-friendly, energy-saving home. Both the clients and the design team envisioned the house as a model of environmental sensitivity and materials selection was critical to their success. To that end, designer Vincent Petrarca, Associate AIA, specified 1500 square feet of VMZINC flat lock panel for the home’s double-height “public” space.

“The color, material qualities, and the system of interlocking panels created a detailed texture of surface and shadow on the exterior facade of the two-story public space of the house,” said Petrarca. “In order to meet the goals of the a LEED for Homes Silver project, we selected zinc as a key feature in the exterior composition of materials. Not only is it 100 percent recyclable, but it’s also durable and low maintenance with a lifespan of nearly 100 years. This was very appealing to the clients.” READ THE ENTIRE ARTICLE

The GREENville House

June 15, 2010 (GREENVILLE, NC) – The GREENville HOUSE designed and built by Tonic Design and Tonic Construction was awarded LEED Silver certification by the USGBC for achievement in green homebuilding and design.

LEED for Homes is a green home certification program that rewards homes that are designed and built to be energy- and resource-efficient and more healthy and durable for the occupants. LEED-certified homes complete a technically rigorous process that often includes a home energy (HERS) rating and onsite inspections to verify that the home is built to be energy and water efficient, environmentally sound, and a healthier place to live.

Driven by technologically advanced systems, sensitive building placement and site orientation, the house tracks the sun as it stretches away from its own shadow.  Private spaces fill narrow bars, extending into the landscape and away from a double height, public volume created to satisfy the requests of the clients’ young and expanding family. These bands of rooms allow natural light to be captured, easy cross ventilation and maximized solar access. Photovoltaic panels and perforated aluminum screens work in concert to provide shading and generate energy to each of these bars.

Tonic Design + Tonic Construction has won several American Institute of Architect awards at the local, state, regional and national levels and has been featured in Dwell, Residential Architect, Custom Home, and Architectural Record magazines. The GREENville HOUSE has been featured in Architectural Record and Inform Magazine and is the winner of a 2010 AIA Triangle award and a Gail Lindsey Sustainibility Award. For more information visit www.tonic-design.com.

About LEED for Homes

LEED for Homes is a third-party certification system for building and designing high-performance green homes that are energy-and-resource-efficient and healthy for its occupants.  Developed and administered by USGBC, LEED for Homes awards points to projects in eight categories of environmental performance: Innovation & Design Process, Location & Linkages, Sustainable Sites, Water Efficiency, Indoor Environmental Quality, Energy & Atmosphere, Materials & Resources, and Awareness & Education. To date, more than 5,000 homes have achieved certification with LEED for Homes program, and over 20,000 have registered and are in process.

The Walters Residence is slated for LEED Silver certification. Todd Lanning, photographer

The Walters Residence is slated for LEED Silver certification. Todd Lanning, photographer

By Georgia Bizios, FAIA, and Katie Wakeford

Bobby and Kristi Walters hired Tonic Design and Tonic Construction, sibling businesses based in Raleigh, North Carolina to help them create what would ultimately be a 4,000 square-foot home for a growing family on a three acre site.  It’s a contemporary home that exceeds their aspirations thanks to green strategies and smart process.

Projcted to receive LEED Silver Certification from the USGBC, the Tonic team pursued energy-efficiency, water conservation, waste reduction, durability, and occupant health and comfort. Features include geothermal heating and cooling, rainwater collection in an underground cistern for irrigation, solar hot water with a tankless backup system, and low maintenance, highly durable materials such as zinc and cedar siding. READ MORE…