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RESIDENTIAL PROJECTS

 

During the evening “ModHop” Tour of private houses in Raleigh

 Hawthorne Exterior_Streetview

(Photos by Raymond Goodman)

 The Hawthorne Residence (above left), a modern, award-winning home in Raleigh’s historic Cameron Park neighborhood, will be open to the public during the “ModHop” Tour, an evening house tour on September 6th from 6 –  8:30 p.m. hosted by North Carolina Modernist Houses in association with the 2017 Hopscotch Design Festival.

Designed and built by Tonic Design principles Katherine Hogan, AIA, and Vincent Petrarca, this single-family home replaced a dark, cramped, early 20th-century bungalow to give the owners modernist light, space, and form, and a strong connection between indoors and outdoors.

To achieve the indoor-outdoor connection, the designers dropped the back elevation to grade and used floor-to-ceiling glass on the exterior wall to expand the view and living space into the backyard. A single-tilt roof with deep, cantilevered overhangs reference the covered porches of neighboring houses. Operable windows and extensive glazing throughout the house allow for daylight and natural ventilation, greatly reducing the homeowners’ reliance on electric lights during the day. A geothermal ground-source heat pump, fiber-cement rain-screen panels on exterior walls, locally available wood detailing, and Energy Star appliances make it 50 percent more energy efficient than a standard new home and 80 percent more efficient than the average resale home.

tonic design, Modernist house in Cameron Park

The two-story house is transparent from the front door through the main living area (above) and on through the kitchen and dining space to the backyard. A sleek staircase composition makes the vertical circulation a sculptural presence at the center of the interior while leading to the children’s bedrooms and central play space upstairs. Crisp white walls and warm wood flooring throughout the house underscore the simple, modern interior.

Hogan and Petrarca will be on hand to answer tour participants’ questions about the Hawthorne Residence during the ModHop Tour.

For more information on the tour and to purchase tickets, go to http://www.ncmodernist.org/modhop17.

For more information on Tonic Design, visit www.tonic-design.com.

 

 

 

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For transforming an old masonry building into a light-filled space for working and living.

The "Live Work" home/studio near downtown Raleigh.

The “Live Work” home/studio near downtown Raleigh.

“Live Work,” the transformation of a derelict building into a 650-square-foot combination home and design studio by Tonic Design+ Tonic Construction in Raleigh received a Merit Award during the American Institute of Architects North Carolina Chapter’s 2014 Design and Chapter Awards Gala held in Charlotte this year.

Located on the edge of a mixed-use neighborhood (industrial and residential) near downtown Raleigh, the one-story masonry building was in dire disrepair. Rather than raze it, however, Tonic’s team decided to “recycle” it into studio space up front for the young firm and living quarters in back for the principals/married couple Vinny Petrarca and Katherine Hogan, AIA, and their one young daughter initially.

Petrarca and Hogan describe the design-build project as “an exercise in balance, reduction and efficiency…[linking] architectural practice, financial stability, and local community.” In just 13 weeks, including time to purchase the property and get all necessary permits, the firm and three summer interns from NC State University’s College of Design planned and renovated the living/working space, which includes a small walled garden that, in effect, doubles the living space and connects the indoors to the outdoors. To allow natural light to penetrate the interior, the designers raised the roof by 12 inches and installed a band of clerestory windows.

The living quarters originally combined bedroom/living room, dining room, and kitchen in one space. When a second daughter came along, the partners “borrowed” some space from the studio to create a separate bedroom. An abundance of built-in cabinets keeps the diminutive space organized and uncluttered.

“Live Work” was submitted to AIA NC’s new Residential Design category, which is intended to “recognize architects whose designs answer the unique requests of the clients and the diverse landscape of North Carolina,” according to the website.

The AIA NC honor marks the 26th design award this young firm has received. For more information on Tonic Design + Tonic Construction, visit http://www.tonic-design.com.

For more information on the 2014 AIA NC Design Awards, go to http://www.aiancawards.org.

Raleigh design-build firm lands Jury’s and People’s Choice category

The Rank House received First Prize in the Jury Awards and Third Place in the People's Choice category. Photo courtesy of Raymond Goodman

The Rank House received First Prize in the Jury Awards and Third Place in the People’s Choice category. Photo
courtesy of Raymond Goodman

awards.

August 7, 2013 (Raleigh, NC) – The unusual “Modern Gothic” house designed and built by Tonic Design + Tonic Construction received the coveted First Prize in the professional Jury Awards category and Third Prize in the People’s Choice category during the second annual George Matsumoto Prize for modernist home design in North Carolina. The competition is sponsored by North Carolina Modernist Houses (formerly Triangle Modernist Houses).

The award-winning project is the new Rank Residence, the home of local music legend and recording artist Michael Rank and his young son. Featured recently in the Raleigh News & Observer, the flat-roofed, four-story, 3200-square-foot house satisfies the homeowner’s fascination with tall vertical spaces and staircases. The exterior is comprised of concrete and black standing-seam metal siding. Narrow vertical windows, placed within the metal seams, recall notes in sheet music, add to the house’s verticality while allowing for fast, affordable construction.

On the ground floor, a four-car garage provides room for Rank’s muscle cars and dragster. An eleven-foot-tall concrete entry staircase leads up to the home’s main level and triple-height main living space. Overhead, a network of black metal stairs and ramps lead to the rooms on the upper levels, including bedrooms, baths, a library, and a studio where the musician can write and record his music. As a design-build firm, Tonic served as both home designer and general contractor.

 

The jury liked stairs as the connecting factor between the house's volumes. Photo by Raymond Goodman

The jury liked stairs as the connecting factor between the house’s volumes. Photo by Raymond Goodman

“The jury liked the use of the stair as an ordering element because it formed the connective tissue of the design,” reported jury chairman Frank Harmon, FAIA, during the awards presentations held recently in the AIA NC Center for Architecture & Design in Raleigh. “They thought the interior spatial clarity was compelling. They admired the designers’ creative response to the program for a father-son dwelling, and for the homage paid to the client’s music.”

Tonic’s co-owners Vinny Petrarca and Katherine Hogan received the $3000 cash prize for First Place in the Jury category, presented by North Carolina Modernist Houses, a non-profit organization dedicated to documenting, preserving, and promoting modernist residential design in North Carolina.

For more information on Tonic Design + Tonic Construction and the Rank Residence, visit www.tonic-design.com.

 

(NOTE: Arquitectura + Acero is published in Chile so the article is in Spanish)

Esta casa se instala en un barrio bastante convencional al que no quiere ofender con su propuesta 352x246-images-stories-proyectos-SMARTsTELLhOUSE-Smart_3_Rear_Exterior_Daysimple pero claramente diferenciada de las construcciones vecinas. Para ello recurre a dos operaciones básicas: alejarse y cerrarse hacia la calle y abrirse al lago y el paisaje. La orientación sur oriente (recordar que la casa está en el hemisferio norte), las pendientes naturales del terreno y las vistas sobre el lago son favorables a esta decisión. Esta orientación también favorece la estrategia de eficiencia energética que es condición incorporada en el diseño. Una terraza con amplias celosías de madera controla las ganancias solares en verano y asegura un eficiente asoleamiento en invierno del volumen que alberga los recintos principales. READ MORE…