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Tonic Design addition

Old meets new and leaves room for a backyard. Photo © Keith Isaacs

Tonic Design’s very modern addition to a red-brick, Georgian Revival-style house built in 1916 is the recipient of a 2018 Merit Award from the North Carolina chapter of the American Institute of Architects (AIA NC). This marks the 11th time Tonic Design’s partners/principals Katherine Hogan, AIA, and Vincent Petrarca have received an AIA NC design award.

The AIA NC Awards program recognizes architects regionally and nationally for exceptional design expertise. Each winning project must exceed benchmarks for outstanding architectural design, structural composition, and application of design theory.

Perforated staircase between the original house and the addition. Photo © Keith Isaacs

The solution responds to the intent of the old house, building upon its narrative of family, heritage, fine taste, and social grace. Simultaneously, it introduces an entirely new narrative that tells the story of a more open, relaxed lifestyle with 21st-century amenities and attention to energy efficiency. Both narratives are articulated through materiality (brick and steel), form (a historic foursquare box and a simple rectilinear appendage), and spatial relationships created through floorplan.

As a result, the residence has been reinvented into a home that embraces casual, modern living without having to sacrifice any of the charm and character of the historic house.

Tonic Design wrapped the 1500-square foot addition’s simple, rectilinear form in Corten® steel, lots of glass, and natural wood and kept the volume within the outer perimeters of the original house. By separating the spatial needs between two floors, the partners also provided the owners with a generous backyard despite the property’s compact size.

The 2018 AIA NC jury called Tonic Design’s solution “thoughtful.” They admired the slim, double-height space the partners slipped between old and new, which solved many potential problems and kept the back brick wall of the old house exposed inside. They appreciated the slim profile of the perforated metal staircase in the interstitial corridor that maintains the addition’s light-filled ambiance while adding easy access to the upper floor.

“We share this award with our inspirational clients and with all of the highly skilled professionals who made this challenging project a pleasure to complete,” said Petrarca.

For more information on the Hillcrest addition and Tonic Design, visit http://www.tonic-design.com/.

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Tonic Design modern addition in Cameron Park.

A red brick Georgian Revival house built in 1916 welcomes a modern, glass and steel addition on a narrow lot in Raleigh’s Cameron Park neighborhood.

The project involved designing a modern, 1500-square-foot addition for a two-story, red brick, Georgian Revival-style house built in 1916 in a historic inner-city neighborhood with narrow lots and minimal set-backs between houses. The addition would become the primary hub of activity for a growing family and an ideal space for entertaining. Programmatically, it would include an open kitchen, dining, living area and a spacious master bedroom suite.

Tonic Design modern addition to historic house

Inside the Hillcrest addition.

To uphold the general scale of this neighborhood and the manner in which the existing house has addressed the street for over 100 years, the addition’s mass is held within the outer planes of the old house, tucked against its rear elevation. And unlike other proposals the owners had seen, the plan divided the public and private spaces between two stories rather than letting the new construction consume the majority of the property. As a result, the architects retained a generous backyard for outdoor play space.

For the exterior walls, the architects chose Corten® steel because it is as durable as the old house’s brick veneer and it relates to its color tones. The wood siding at the rear elevation adds an element of warmth to the rugged steel, similar to the way in which the old house’s white wood trim creates softer edges against the brick.

How the existing house and the new construction linked together structurally presented the challenge. READ MORE…

A house in the woods doesn’t have to be rustic….

Tonic Design modern custom house

Photo: Tzu Chen Photography

…Piedmont Retreat

Durham, North Carolina
Tonic Design devised this Corten steel–clad home in a wooded neighborhood in Durham, North Carolina. The exterior is designed to weather and eventually blend in with the surroundings. The rear of the two-story, 3,800-square-foot house is glazed to take advantage of the forest views. READ MORE

Tonic Design Raleigh NC

Rear elevation overlooking the forest. (Tzu Chen Photography)

Wrapped in vertical stripes of Corten® steel street-side, with vast expanses of floor-to-ceiling glass and cantilevered windows overlooking the forest behind it, a modern house sits quietly in the corner of a cul-de-sac in Durham.

Katherine Hogan, AIA, and Vinny Petrarca of Tonic Design in Raleigh are responsible for this creative two-story, 3800-square-foot, single-family structure that will, as the steel continues to weather, blend into the natural setting and never need painting. Their clients loved the concept since they wanted a low-maintenance house with a modest public presence.

The owners also wanted to maintain a direct visual connection to their beautiful wooded site. The abundant glazing fulfills that wish. READ MORE…

Tonic Design

Corten® steel provides a modest, low-maintenance exterior (it will never need painting) that will eventually weather to blend into the natural setting. Photo: Tzu Chen Photography

by Lucy Wang

Raleigh-based Tonic Design completed a creative new home that plays with the contrast between old and new through the use of reclaimed and contemporary materials. Tucked into the forests of Durham, the Piedmont Retreat is a 3,800-square-foot single-family home that embraces the outdoors in its use of weathered materials and large cantilevered windows. Reclaimed materials, like oak flooring and factory lights, help soften the modern steel and glass construction. READ MORE…

Tonic Design

Corten® steel provides a modest, low-maintenance exterior (it will never need painting) that will eventually weather to blend into the natural setting. Photo: Tzu Chen Photography

Wrapped in vertical stripes of Corten® steel street-side, with vast expanses of floor-to-ceiling glass and cantilevered windows overlooking the forest behind it, a modern house in the corner of a cul-de-sac in Durham dubbed “Piedmont Retreat” was honored recently with a Merit Award during the 2017 AIA North Carolina Residential Design Awards program.

Katherine Hogan, AIA, and Vinny Petrarca of Tonic Design in Raleigh are responsible for this creative two-story, single-family structure that will, as the steel continues to weather, blend into the natural setting and never need painting. Their clients loved the concept since they wanted a low-maintenance house with a modest public presence. READ MORE…

 

During the evening “ModHop” Tour of private houses in Raleigh

 Hawthorne Exterior_Streetview

(Photos by Raymond Goodman)

 The Hawthorne Residence (above left), a modern, award-winning home in Raleigh’s historic Cameron Park neighborhood, will be open to the public during the “ModHop” Tour, an evening house tour on September 6th from 6 –  8:30 p.m. hosted by North Carolina Modernist Houses in association with the 2017 Hopscotch Design Festival.

Designed and built by Tonic Design principles Katherine Hogan, AIA, and Vincent Petrarca, this single-family home replaced a dark, cramped, early 20th-century bungalow to give the owners modernist light, space, and form, and a strong connection between indoors and outdoors.

To achieve the indoor-outdoor connection, the designers dropped the back elevation to grade and used floor-to-ceiling glass on the exterior wall to expand the view and living space into the backyard. A single-tilt roof with deep, cantilevered overhangs reference the covered porches of neighboring houses. Operable windows and extensive glazing throughout the house allow for daylight and natural ventilation, greatly reducing the homeowners’ reliance on electric lights during the day. A geothermal ground-source heat pump, fiber-cement rain-screen panels on exterior walls, locally available wood detailing, and Energy Star appliances make it 50 percent more energy efficient than a standard new home and 80 percent more efficient than the average resale home.

tonic design, Modernist house in Cameron Park

The two-story house is transparent from the front door through the main living area (above) and on through the kitchen and dining space to the backyard. A sleek staircase composition makes the vertical circulation a sculptural presence at the center of the interior while leading to the children’s bedrooms and central play space upstairs. Crisp white walls and warm wood flooring throughout the house underscore the simple, modern interior.

Hogan and Petrarca will be on hand to answer tour participants’ questions about the Hawthorne Residence during the ModHop Tour.

For more information on the tour and to purchase tickets, go to http://www.ncmodernist.org/modhop17.

For more information on Tonic Design, visit www.tonic-design.com.